Category: Construction Litigation

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Washington Supreme Court Re-Examines Economic Loss Rule

The Economic Loss Rule plays an important part in construction disputes, but it has not been clearly defined or understood, or so the Washington Supreme Court has recently stated. The Economic Loss Rule has been generally described as applying to “economic damages” in cases where the plaintiff has a contract that addresses or could reasonably address the … Continue Reading

A Rose by any Other Name…. But Are You Really Insured?

Do you think you have adequate insurance protection for your project under an “additional insured endorsement” to another entity’s policy? Or through a “wrap” policy, known as either an Owner’s Controlled Insurance Policy (OCIP) or Contractor’s Controlled Insurance Policy (CCIP), because you are listed as “an insured”? Perhaps not under more recent policies. Check the … Continue Reading

Be careful what you ask for Idaho

In the last two decades, the Idaho State Legislature has authorized design-build contracting for many different types of public projects. It appears that the Legislature will continue this trend for highway projects. In February, a House committee voted to print a bill that would allow the Idaho Transportation Department (IDT) to award design-build contracts for highway projects.  … Continue Reading

Negligence Claims Take Another Twist in Oregon

Just when you thought it was safe to go back into the water, the Oregon Court of Appeals strikes again with another iteration of the “economic loss doctrine” which defines when parties can sue each other in negligence for construction defects. In Abraham v. Henry (September 2, 2009) the Court held that parties to a … Continue Reading

Oregon Court of Appeals Provides Clarification to Contractor Negligence Claims

The Oregon Court of Appeals recently issued an opinion in Abraham v. T. Henry Construction, Inc., et al., a residential construction defect case, that helps clarify the circumstances under which a contractor may be sued for negligence. The issue of whether a contractor may be sued for negligence, as opposed to breach of contract is, in … Continue Reading
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