Bringing a construction project to fruition involves significant risks to project owners, designers, and contractors. Many of those risks will be allocated in the parties’ contracts, in turn requiring those parties to obtain insurance and further allocating risks to insurance companies. Several commonly used insurance policies are at the heart of any construction project insurance

Parties negotiating a design and construction contract for a large project will often leave for the end discussions of a few provisions that one side or the other has characterized as “deal-breakers.” Though the deal may be doomed to fail, one of the parties may also make a concession or concessions, have its bluff called

Over this past summer, our colleague Mario R. Nicholas penned an article for the Daily Journal of Commerce entitled “Can Artificial Intelligence Be Trusted to Draft a Construction Contract?”  It is a great read, and we borrow from it here in many places.

In his article, Mario principally focused on why chatbots like

Construction contracts generally outline when and how contractors should notify parties about potential claims for additional compensation and/or time. These provisions are intended to provide project stakeholders with the information necessary to address unforeseen circumstances and streamline claim resolutions within the project rather than resorting to legal actions. However, in some cases, the contract provisions

In their focus on starting a construction project, developers, designers, and contractors can fall prey to unintended consequences arising from their deferral to and use of an “industry standard” contract form—as opposed to taking the time to precisely tailor the contract to the project’s needs and risks. In my latest article for the Daily Journal

In the construction industry, “retainage”—the practice of withholding by an owner or contractor a portion of the funds that are due to a contractor or subcontractor for a construction project until its completion—is a term frequently negotiated in contracts for private construction projects as a means to mitigate the risk of default since the monies

Many standard construction contracts include a placeholder for incentives for a contractor that completes a new project on time and under budget. Possible rewards include early completion bonuses and/or sharing in the project savings, if any, which can be calculated in several ways. In my latest article for the Daily Journal of Commerce, I

The party responding to a proposed design or construction contract may satisfy itself that the contract proposes arbitration or litigation to resolve any disputes and leave it at that—as long as the method of resolution is generally aligned with the party’s preferences. In order to eliminate surprises for their clients if a dispute arises and

A construction project can be delayed for a multitude of reasons. Where the cause of the delay is not force majeure, or other excusable delay by a contractor, and where the contractor has some fault, what level of actions must a contractor take to satisfy the terms “best efforts” or “reasonable efforts” or “commercially reasonable